The Brown Bread thread

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Tommo
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Re: The Brown Bread thread

Post by Tommo » Tue Jan 23, 2018 2:03 pm

Tinky Winky 52.
They're all here!

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Rogg
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Re: The Brown Bread thread

Post by Rogg » Tue Jan 23, 2018 8:06 pm

Tommo wrote:Tinky Winky 52.
Scott Mitchell @scottydogdart 2h
Loved the plum colour one gutted !!!! @DorsetDarts
Goldsaddle Goatfish
cnt go round calliNG people cyclops

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Randall
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Re: The Brown Bread thread

Post by Randall » Tue Jan 23, 2018 8:09 pm

Rogg wrote:
Tommo wrote:Tinky Winky 52.
Scott Mitchell @scottydogdart 2h
Loved the plum colour one gutted !!!! @DorsetDarts
I'd like to think this is sarcasm but with Mitchell.........

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Re: The Brown Bread thread

Post by Rogg » Tue Jan 23, 2018 8:11 pm

Randall wrote:
Rogg wrote:
Tommo wrote:Tinky Winky 52.
Scott Mitchell @scottydogdart 2h
Loved the plum colour one gutted !!!! @DorsetDarts
I'd like to think this is sarcasm but with Mitchell.........
:lol: :)
Goldsaddle Goatfish
cnt go round calliNG people cyclops

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Billy Graham 99

Post by Clownin » Wed Feb 21, 2018 2:50 pm

https://www.yahoo.com/news/billy-graham ... 51604.html

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Billy Graham, the famed evangelist who became known as “America’s Pastor,” has died at the age of 99, The Associated Press reported.

Graham died at his home Wednesday morning from natural causes, a family spokesman told ABC News.

Born in 1918 in Charlotte, North Carolina, William Franklin Graham Jr. was the oldest of the four children of William and Morrow Graham. He was raised on a dairy farm, and little in his childhood suggested he would become a world-renowned preacher.

Then at 16, Graham attended a series of revival meetings run by outspoken evangelist Mordecai Ham. The two months he spent listening to Ham’s sermons on sin sparked a spiritual awakening in Graham and prompted him to enroll at Bob Jones College. When the conservative Christian school’s strict doctrine didn’t align with his personal beliefs, he transferred to the Florida Bible Institute (now Trinity College of Florida) and joined a Southern Baptist Convention church. He was ordained in 1939.

Billy Graham, seen in 2010, has died at the age of 99, it was reported on Wednesday. (CHRIS KEANE / Reuters)
Graham received additional training at Illinois’ Wheaton College, where he met his future wife, Ruth McCue Bell. They were married for 64 years, until her death in 2007, and had five children.

After serving briefly as the pastor of the First Baptist Church in Western Springs, Illinois, Graham launched his first radio program, “Songs in the Night,” in 1943. Although he left a year later, Graham liked the idea of sharing his message with a wide audience. As noted on his website, Graham took Jesus Christ literally when he said in Mark 16:15: “Go ye into all the world and preach the Gospel to every creature.”

Graham was still in his early 30s when entered the public spotlight by giving a series of well-attended “sin-smashing” revival meetings that were held under a circus tent in a Los Angeles parking lot. The press took interest in the charismatic young preacher and began writing articles about him. To get his message to even more people, Graham founded his own ministry, the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association.

Graham viewed the Bible as the infallible word of God. He believed that Jesus led a sinless life and that all men were lost and would face God’s judgment. Most importantly, he was convinced he must use “every modern means of communication available” to spread the Gospel throughout the world, and did so in print, on radio and television, online and in person.

Graham’s sermons promoted evangelism and railed against “godless communism,” drugs, sex and violence. And for the next five decades, his electric personality connected with audiences in more than 185 countries.

Graham was the first evangelist of note to speak behind the Iron Curtain, and during the Apartheid era he refused to visit South Africa until the government allowed integrated seating at his events. He published dozens of best-selling books, including Angels: God’s Secret Agents and The Jesus Generation, and wrote a weekly column that was syndicated in hundreds of newspapers.

Graham received numerous honors, including the Horatio Alger Award, the George Washington Honor Medal, the Ronald Reagan Freedom Award and the Congressional Gold Medal. A highway in Charlotte bears his name, as does part of Interstate 240 near his home in Asheville, North Carolina. In 1989, he became the first clergyman to be granted a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his work as a minister.

Graham also had a major effect on the civil rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s. His early crusades were segregated, but once the U.S. Supreme Court issued its landmark Brown v. Board of Education ruling in 1954, which found public school segregation unconstitutional, Graham integrated the seatings at his revival meetings.

Graham befriended the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. as well, and together they preached to more than 2 million people in New York City. When questioned about his views on faith and race, Graham argued there was no scriptural basis for segregation.

As his message spread, Graham was granted personal audiences with royalty, dignitaries and many sitting presidents, from Harry S. Truman to Barack Obama. Three presidents were even on hand in 2007 for the dedication of the Billy Graham Library in Charlotte. Despite being a registered Democrat, Graham opposed the candidacy of John F. Kennedy, and actively encouraged other religious leaders to speak out about the dangers of having a Roman Catholic in the White House.

Though beloved by millions, Graham was not without his detractors. Some fundamentalist Christians took issue with his ecumenical approach to evangelism, and after his 1957 crusade in New York, opponents of Graham’s more liberal theology began calling him “the Antichrist.” According to the biography Billy: A Personal Look at Bill Graham, the World’s Best-Loved Evangelist by Sherwood Eliot Wirt, one Christian educator even said that Graham was “the worst thing to happen to the Christian church in two thousand years.” More recently, detractors blasted Graham’s continued belief that homosexual behavior was a “sinister form of perversion,” and his intolerance against the very presence of gay and lesbian couples within Christianity.

As his health began to fail, Graham decided to announce his retirement in 2005. His final sermon, “The Cross ― Billy Graham’s Message To America,” called for a national spiritual awakening.
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Re: Billy Graham 99

Post by Sin » Thu Feb 22, 2018 9:40 pm

Clownin wrote:https://www.yahoo.com/news/billy-graham ... 51604.html

Image

Billy Graham, the famed evangelist who became known as “America’s Pastor,” has died at the age of 99, The Associated Press reported.

Graham died at his home Wednesday morning from natural causes, a family spokesman told ABC News.

Born in 1918 in Charlotte, North Carolina, William Franklin Graham Jr. was the oldest of the four children of William and Morrow Graham. He was raised on a dairy farm, and little in his childhood suggested he would become a world-renowned preacher.

Then at 16, Graham attended a series of revival meetings run by outspoken evangelist Mordecai Ham. The two months he spent listening to Ham’s sermons on sin sparked a spiritual awakening in Graham and prompted him to enroll at Bob Jones College. When the conservative Christian school’s strict doctrine didn’t align with his personal beliefs, he transferred to the Florida Bible Institute (now Trinity College of Florida) and joined a Southern Baptist Convention church. He was ordained in 1939.

Billy Graham, seen in 2010, has died at the age of 99, it was reported on Wednesday. (CHRIS KEANE / Reuters)
Graham received additional training at Illinois’ Wheaton College, where he met his future wife, Ruth McCue Bell. They were married for 64 years, until her death in 2007, and had five children.

After serving briefly as the pastor of the First Baptist Church in Western Springs, Illinois, Graham launched his first radio program, “Songs in the Night,” in 1943. Although he left a year later, Graham liked the idea of sharing his message with a wide audience. As noted on his website, Graham took Jesus Christ literally when he said in Mark 16:15: “Go ye into all the world and preach the Gospel to every creature.”

Graham was still in his early 30s when entered the public spotlight by giving a series of well-attended “sin-smashing” revival meetings that were held under a circus tent in a Los Angeles parking lot. The press took interest in the charismatic young preacher and began writing articles about him. To get his message to even more people, Graham founded his own ministry, the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association.

Graham viewed the Bible as the infallible word of God. He believed that Jesus led a sinless life and that all men were lost and would face God’s judgment. Most importantly, he was convinced he must use “every modern means of communication available” to spread the Gospel throughout the world, and did so in print, on radio and television, online and in person.

Graham’s sermons promoted evangelism and railed against “godless communism,” drugs, sex and violence. And for the next five decades, his electric personality connected with audiences in more than 185 countries.

Graham was the first evangelist of note to speak behind the Iron Curtain, and during the Apartheid era he refused to visit South Africa until the government allowed integrated seating at his events. He published dozens of best-selling books, including Angels: God’s Secret Agents and The Jesus Generation, and wrote a weekly column that was syndicated in hundreds of newspapers.

Graham received numerous honors, including the Horatio Alger Award, the George Washington Honor Medal, the Ronald Reagan Freedom Award and the Congressional Gold Medal. A highway in Charlotte bears his name, as does part of Interstate 240 near his home in Asheville, North Carolina. In 1989, he became the first clergyman to be granted a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his work as a minister.

Graham also had a major effect on the civil rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s. His early crusades were segregated, but once the U.S. Supreme Court issued its landmark Brown v. Board of Education ruling in 1954, which found public school segregation unconstitutional, Graham integrated the seatings at his revival meetings.

Graham befriended the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. as well, and together they preached to more than 2 million people in New York City. When questioned about his views on faith and race, Graham argued there was no scriptural basis for segregation.

As his message spread, Graham was granted personal audiences with royalty, dignitaries and many sitting presidents, from Harry S. Truman to Barack Obama. Three presidents were even on hand in 2007 for the dedication of the Billy Graham Library in Charlotte. Despite being a registered Democrat, Graham opposed the candidacy of John F. Kennedy, and actively encouraged other religious leaders to speak out about the dangers of having a Roman Catholic in the White House.

Though beloved by millions, Graham was not without his detractors. Some fundamentalist Christians took issue with his ecumenical approach to evangelism, and after his 1957 crusade in New York, opponents of Graham’s more liberal theology began calling him “the Antichrist.” According to the biography Billy: A Personal Look at Bill Graham, the World’s Best-Loved Evangelist by Sherwood Eliot Wirt, one Christian educator even said that Graham was “the worst thing to happen to the Christian church in two thousand years.” More recently, detractors blasted Graham’s continued belief that homosexual behavior was a “sinister form of perversion,” and his intolerance against the very presence of gay and lesbian couples within Christianity.

As his health began to fail, Graham decided to announce his retirement in 2005. His final sermon, “The Cross ― Billy Graham’s Message To America,” called for a national spiritual awakening.
TLDNR, fuck off shit cunt

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Re: Billy Graham 99

Post by Clownin » Sat Feb 24, 2018 2:22 pm

Sin wrote:
TLDNR, fuck off shit cunt
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You really do luv me, don't you Sin? Clownin has a forum girlfriend. :lol:
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Re: The Brown Bread thread

Post by Randall » Sun Mar 04, 2018 1:19 pm

Roger bannisters time trial is over.

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Re: The Brown Bread thread

Post by Clownin » Sun Mar 04, 2018 1:59 pm

http://variety.com/2018/tv/news/david-o ... 202716860/

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David Ogden Stiers, best known for his role as the arrogant surgeon Major Charles Emerson Winchester III on “MASH,” died Saturday. He was 75.

His agent, Mitchell K. Stubbs, tweeted that he died of bladder cancer at his home in Newport, Ore.

For his work on “MASH,” Stiers was twice Emmy nominated for outstanding supporting actor in a comedy or variety or music series, in 1981 and 1982, and he earned a third Emmy nomination for his performance in NBC miniseries “The First Olympics: Athens 1896” as William Milligan Sloane, the founder of the U.S. Olympic Committee.

The actor, with his educated, resonant intonations — though he did not share Major Winchester’s Boston Brahmin accent — was much in demand for narration and voiceover work, and for efforts as the narrator and as of Disney’s enormous hit animated film “Beauty and the Beast,” he shared a Grammy win for best recording for children and another nomination for album of the year.

He voiced Dr. Jumba Jookiba, the evil genius who created Stitch, in 2002’s “Lilo & Stitch” and various spinoffs; once he became part of the Disney family, Stiers went on to do voicework on a large number of movies, made for TV or video content and videogames.

In addition to serving as narrator and as the voice of Cogsworth in “Beauty and the Beast” in 1991, he voiced Governor Ratcliffe and Wiggins in Disney’s 1995 animated effort “Pocahontas” and voiced the Archdeacon in Disney’s “The Hunchback of Notre Dame.” He also contributed the voice of the grandfather for the English-language version of Hayao Miyazaki’s 1992 animation “Porco Rosso” and of Kamaji in Miyazki’s classic “Spirited Away” in 2001. From 2011-15 he recurred on Cartoon Network’s “Regular Show.”

Indeed, it was his voice that earned him his first screen credit — as the announcer in George Lucas’ 1971 film “THX 1138.”

Stiers was also known for the eight Perry Mason TV movies he made between 1986-88 in which his prosecuting attorney invariably lost to Raymond Burr’s Mason, and more recently he had recurred on the USA Network series “The Dead Zone” from 2002-07 as the Rev. Eugene Purdy, the chief antagonist to star Anthony Michael Hall’s Johnny Smith.

In addition Stiers worked repeatedly for director Woody Allen, appearing in “Shadows and Fog,” “Mighty Aphrodite,” “Everybody Says I Love You” and “Curse of the Jade Scorpion” (in which he played a mysterious hypnotist).

On “MASH” Stiers’ Major Winchester was witty where Frank Burns had been vapid — with his Harvard education, a match for Alan Alda’s Hawkeye in the operating room and, unlike Frank, a worthy adversary in the ongoing battle of the pranks in the Swamp. So it was always poignant when an emotional crack opened in his self-satisfied mien.

In the season eight episode “Morale Victory,” Winchester is proud of saving a wounded soldier’s leg, only to learn that the minor injury to the young man’s hand is all that matters to him, as he is a concert pianist. The soldier feels he has no reason for living, but in a powerful performance by Stiers, Winchester provides him with piano music written for a single hand and shows him the empathy necessary to save him.

Another time the audience saw a different side to Stier’s Winchester came in the ninth-season episode in which he swallows his pride and attempts to curry favor with a general who can send him back to the comforts of Tokyo — but in the end, when the general asks him to testify unjustly against Margaret Houlihan — Winchester declares, “I will not — even for a return to that pearl of the Orient Tokyo — lie to protect you while destroying a friend’s career!”

In the busy year of 1985, Stiers also played the father to John Cusack’s hero in the ’80s teen movie “Better Off Dead” and the bitter enemy to Peter O’Toole’s eccentric scientist in “Creator,” while also appearing in ABC miniseries “North and South” as Congressman Sam Greene.

The next year would bring more work in the form of “North and South Book II” — and Stiers would begin a long series of “Perry Mason” telepics in which he played the always-fated-t0-lose prosecuting attorney. There were two of these NBC movies in 1986 and eight overall through 1988.

He played Franklin D. Roosevelt twice: in “J. Edgar Hoover” and in Emmy-winning 1989 telepic “Day One,” about the Manhattan Project. In another esteemed telepic that year, “The Final Days,” about the Nixon White House, the actor played Gen. Alexander Haig.

In addition to his work for Woody Allen, he played a wealthy railroad magnate in the live action Disney film “Iron Will” in 1994, a judge in the 1995 CIA thriller “Bad Company,” starring Ellen Barkin and Laurence Fishburne, and appeared in Frank Darabont’s Jim Carrey vehicle “The Majestic” in 2001.

The actor also continued appearing on television, guesting on shows including “Murder, She Wrote” and recurring on ABC’s “Two Guys, a Girl and a Pizza Place” in 1998 as the eccentric Mr. Bauer, who relayed the plots of movies as if they were stories of what had happened to him. He was a series regular on the brief CBS series “Love & Money” in 1999. In 2003 he memorably guested on an episode of “Frasier” in which Stiers played a former research associate of Frasier’s who is so like him and Niles, it has Martin questioning whether he is really their father.

David Allen Ogden Stiers was born not in New England but in Peoria, Illinois, though the family moved to Eugene, Oregon, while he was in high school. He briefly attended the University of Oregon, began his professional career at the Actors Workshop in San Francisco, the California Shakespeare Festival and improv group the Committee before heading East and, starting in 1968, attending New York’s Juilliard and then joining at launch the Houseman Acting Company, where he was mentored by John Houseman.

Stiers made his Broadway debut with simultaneous 1973 revivals of Chekhov’s “The Three Sisters,” in which he played Kulygin; “The Beggar’s Opera,” in which he played Peachum; “Measure for Measure,” in which he played the Duke; and Moliere’s “Scapin,” in which he played Geronte. Kevin Kline and Patti LuPone were also among those who appeared in the three productions. In 1974 he appeared in “Ulysses in Nighttown,” which was briefly staged on the Rialto starring Zero Mostel. Also that year he had a role in the original Stephen Schwartz musical “The Magic Show.”

In 1971 he made his first bigscreen appearance, in the Jack Nicholson-directed “Drive, He Said.”

He soon had a recurring role on the brief Barnard Hughes sitcom “Doc” and guested on “Kojak,” “Charlie’s Angels,” “Phyllis,” “Mary Tyler Moore” and “Rhoda” before being cast as Major Winchester on “MASH.” Even during his years on the hit show, he appeared in movies including “Oh! God,” starring John Denver and George Burns; “The Cheap Detective,” with Peter Falk; ventriloquist horror movie “Magic” with Anthony Hopkins; and TV movies including “Breaking Up Is Hard to Do” (1979), “The Oldest Living Graduate” (1980), “Father Damien: The Leper Priest” (1980) and “The Day the Bubble Burst.”

In 2009 he returned to Broadway after an absence of many decades to appear in “Irving Berlin’s White Christmas.” The following year he appeared in a Shakespeare Center of Los Angeles production of “Much Ado About Nothing.”

Stiers had his musical side, conducting orchestras around the world.

In 2009, the actor revealed publicly that he was gay. He told ABC News at the time that he had hidden his sexuality for a long time because so much of his income had been derived from family-friendly programming, and coming out thus might have had repercussions in the past.
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Re: The Brown Bread thread

Post by Hutchy72 » Sun Mar 04, 2018 2:28 pm

Piss off Kevin, you tedious old cunt.

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Re: The Brown Bread thread

Post by Tommo » Mon Mar 12, 2018 9:47 am

Doddy, 90.
They're all here!

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Re: The Brown Bread thread

Post by Father Rout » Mon Mar 12, 2018 6:17 pm

Tommo wrote:Doddy, 90.
Diddy?
When you actually feel anger over a place like this it's time to get a life

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Re: The Brown Bread thread

Post by Kimmy » Mon Mar 12, 2018 6:47 pm

Surrey's Finest.

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Randall
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Re: The Brown Bread thread

Post by Randall » Mon Mar 12, 2018 7:23 pm

Tommo wrote:Doddy, 90.
The claims of noncery can now begin

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Re: The Brown Bread thread

Post by Sin » Mon Mar 12, 2018 7:31 pm

Randall wrote:
Tommo wrote:Doddy, 90.
The claims of noncery can now begin
Brucie seems to have escaped that, so Doddy might as well

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Re: The Brown Bread thread

Post by Hutchy72 » Wed Mar 14, 2018 8:06 am

Stephen Hawking leaves the Daleks leaderless.

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Tommo
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Re: The Brown Bread thread

Post by Tommo » Wed Mar 14, 2018 1:02 pm

R.I.P.

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Re: The Brown Bread thread

Post by Mabbsy » Wed Mar 14, 2018 2:45 pm

Jim Bowen gone too, lets have a look at what he could have won !

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Re: The Brown Bread thread

Post by Clownin » Wed Mar 14, 2018 3:56 pm

Mabbsy wrote:Jim Bowen gone too, lets have a look at what he could have won !
The two smartest guys in UK history die on the same day. It must be a sign from above. What now?
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Re: The Brown Bread thread

Post by Randall » Wed Mar 14, 2018 5:04 pm

Mabbsy wrote:Jim Bowen gone too, lets have a look at what he could have won !
Ah ffs.

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